Category Archives: Wild and Scenic

Pittsburg Landing restrooms shine with help from volunteers

Volunteers from the with the Hells Canyon Recreation Collaborative (HCRC), which includes representatives of recreation groups who enjoy the Wild and Scenic Snake River, pose for a photo during a break from work on a facilities upgrade project at Pittsburg Landing campground on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest. Volunteers representing the organizations that formed the collaborative have logged approximately 960 work hours to date since the forests' partnership was established in 2018. USDA Forest Service photo.

It might be the least-glamorous job on the National Forest; making sure people have a safe, sanitary place to retreat to when… well, when nature calls.

That’s why Jeff Stein, a facilities engineer on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, is especially grateful to volunteers from the Hells Canyon Recreation Collaborative (HCRC), who have donated hundreds of hours their time to refurbish three “comfort stations,” or restrooms, at the forest’s Pittsburg Landing campground.

It’s not glamorous work – and some of it requires not just willing pair of hands, but skilled labor, Stein explained.

“We were fortunate, in this case, that we were able to get such a big volunteer effort put together,” he said.

Hells Canyon National Recreation Area and Eagle Cap Wilderness comprise one of 15 national priority areas for trail maintenance under the National Trails Stewardship Act.

HCRC represents several recreation groups comprised of members who enjoy the Snake River, which is federally designated as a Wild and Scenic River and managed as part of the country’s Wild and Scenic river system.

At Pittsburg Landing, the agency’s deferred maintenance backlog had been catching up with the campground’s infrastructure for years, Stein said.

“The siding was getting eaten up by woodpeckers chasing bugs, and then the roofing was original, mid-’80s cedar shingles… They were just wearing out,” he said.

Many of the volunteers traveled long distances to donate their time and labor to the effort.

“There were several people from the Treasure Valley, in the Boise area, and there were people from Washington (State). These people donate a lot just to get themselves there,” Stein said.

Since 2018, HCRC has organized three work parties at the campground, in Sept. 2018, May 2019, and Sept. 2019. Volunteers repaired or replaced the damaged siding, installed new metal roofs, and gave the buildings a few coats of paint. A fourth and final work party to complete the renovations is tentatively scheduled for spring, 2020.

“A lot of them have a somewhat generational history with Hells Canyon, they’ve been going there forever to enjoy hunting, or fishing, and it’s kind of a destination. I think that’s what helped them take as much ownership as they did.”

The collaborative group is organizing several other projects at the site, including vegetation management and a water system upgrade.

“I’m thankful there’s such willingness to help, and get things restored – get things back in order,” Stein said. “The personal sacrifices, that people give up their long weekends to come participate and offer their knowledge and skills. I’m very thankful for that.”

Since it was established in 2018, the group has focused its members’ efforts on a number of deferred maintenance needs in the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area, including both recreation and heritage facilities.

Stein said the collaborative has made a remarkable difference in the quality of campers’ and other recreational users’ experiences in a relatively short time.

“There’s a lot more to it than just replacing the roof on a toilet building,” he said. “There’s … vegetation management within the campground, getting things cleaned up and back to the way they were intended to be when the site was first constructed. And there’s a water system replacement-slash-upgrade project for the campground (that the collaborative is working on).”

“There’s also some noxious weed treatments that the collaborative group is wanting and willing to do within the Hells Canyon corridor,” he said.

Since the partnership began, volunteers from the collaborative have logged approximately 960 work hours on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest.

For more information about the Hells Canyon Recreation Collaborative, visit https://www.facebook.com/groups/HellsCanyonRecreationCollaborative.


Source information: Wallowa-Whitman National Forest and USDA Forest Service – Pacific Northwest Region (staff reports)

BEFORE: A comfort station at the Pittsburg Landing campground, located on Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, as it appeared in Sept 2018, prior to the start of a volunteer-supported renovation effort. The Hells Canyon Recreation Collaborative, whose mission is maintaining and improving recreation access in the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area, recruited volunteers from a number of member organizations to refurbish the aging facility, which district facilities engineer Jeff Stein called "fairly typical" of deferred maintenance needs found at recreational facilities across the Forest Service. USDA Forest Service photo.
BEFORE: A comfort station at the Pittsburg Landing campground, located on Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, as it appeared in Sept 2018, prior to the start of a volunteer-supported renovation effort. USDA Forest Service photo.
AFTER: A comfort station at the Pittsburg Landing campground, located on Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, as it appeared in Sept 2019, following a volunteer-supported renovation effort. The building received a new roof, updated siding, and a fresh coat of paint. The Hells Canyon Recreation Collaborative, whose mission is maintaining and improving recreation access in the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area, recruited volunteers from a number of member organizations to refurbish the aging facility. USDA Forest Service photo.
AFTER: A comfort station at the Pittsburg Landing campground, located on Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, as it appeared in Sept 2019, following a volunteer-supported renovation effort. The building received a new roof, updated siding, and a fresh coat of paint. USDA Forest Service photo.

‘Land of Umpqua’ photo contest winners

A wildcat is spotted through the leaves. Courtesy photo by Lindsay Briley. Awarded First Place-Wildlife in the 2019 Land of Umpqua photo contest, sponsored by the Forest Service, City of Roseburg, and Bureau of Land Management.

ROSEBURG, Ore. (Oct. 1, 2019)  The Roseburg District, Bureau of Land Management and the Umpqua National Forest announced winners of the 2019 “Land of Umpqua” Amateur Photo Contest yesterday.

This past year, the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management have been celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act and National Trails Act.

Amateur photographers submitted a variety of photos featuring the beautiful landscapes and wildlife on BLM and Forest Service -managed lands from around the Umpqua River, Umpqua Valley and surrounding forests.

Photos submitted by amateur photographers were grouped and judged in several categories: “Fall Colors,” “Water,” “Waterfalls and Wilderness,” “Wildlife along Trails and in the Wilderness,” and “Pets on Trails.”

Congratulations to the winners!

Richard Krieger, Waterfalls and Wilderness-First Place

Winning entries, by category:

Fall Colors on Public Lands

  • 1st Place – Tiffni Curley – Roseburg
  • 2nd Place – Kevin Berhardt – Roseburg
  • 3rd Place – Jane Brown

Umpqua Wildlife along Trails and in the Wilderness

  • 1st Place – Lindsay Somers – Roseburg
  • 2nd Place – Lindsay Somers – Roseburg
  • 3rd Place – Tracy Moulden – Myrtle Creek

Water, Waterfalls and Wilderness

  • 1st Place – Richard Krieger – Ashland
  • 2nd Place – Amy Egli – Toketee
  • 3rd Place – Shanti-Rail-Chatfield – Oakland

Pets on Trails

  • 1st Place – Cheri Knott – Roseburg
  • 2nd Place – Lindsay Somers – Roseburg
  • 3rd Place – Kevin Berhardt – Roseburg

The winning photos are available to view at: http://bit.ly/2na3iGt. All photo submissions for the contest can be viewed at: http://bit.ly/2nSy72E.

The Roseburg District, Bureau of Land Management and the Umpqua National Forest hosted the photo contest as part of a multi-agency exhibit at the 23rd Annual Sportsmen’s & Outdoor Recreation Show held earlier this year.

Winners receive prizes, including free overnight stays at BLM and Forest Service campgrounds, as well as Smokey Bear -themed items.

The winning photos are also featured on the BLM and Forest Service Social media services.


Source information: Umpqua National Forest (via Facebook)

Forest Service invites comment re: Wild & Scenic River proposals for Mt. Hood NF

A woman takes notes while standing along the shore below small waterfall along a tributary in the Mt. Hood National Forest in Oregon. USDA Forest Service photo.

The Mt. Hood National Forest and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Northwest Oregon District invite the public to comment on a proposal to adopt a comprehensive river management plan for nine rivers as part of a Wild and Scenic River planning project.

Nine rivers were designated as additions to the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System in the 2009 Omnibus Public Land Management Act for a total of 81 miles of additional wild and scenic river.

The designated rivers are: Collawash River, Eagle Creek, East Fork Hood River, Fifteenmile Creek, Fish Creek, Middle Fork Hood River, South Fork Clackamas River, South Fork Roaring River, and Zigzag River.

The South Fork Clackamas River includes both Forest Service and BLM-administered lands.

The Forest and BLM began the planning process for these rivers in June 2017.

The scoping packet is available for review on the project website: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=54674. Information can also be found on the Wild and Scenic Rivers Comprehensive River Management Plan website and BLM project website.

The purpose of this outreach effort is to invite public involvement process at an early stage of proposal development. Any comments at this stage of project development are welcome. In particular, members of the public who believe they have information the agencies may not be aware of or who have concerns regarding this proposed action are encouraged to send that information in writing to the address provided below.

The agencies anticipate that the level of review necessary for this proposal will be covered through an Environmental Assessment (EA).

Public involvement is a key element of the land management planning process. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Wild and Scenic Rivers Act provides the framework for public participation in the federal decision making process. Public input at this point in the process will help identify issues associated with this planning process and guide development of possible alternatives to the proposed action. Comments will again be solicited from the public and other federal, state and local agencies when a preliminary assessment and draft comprehensive river management plan are available.

The deadline to submit comments is August 26, 2019.

Electronic comments including attachments may be submitted electronically via the website link below. Specific written comments may also be submitted via mail or hand delivered to the Zigzag Ranger Station between the hours of 7:45 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding federal holidays.

Comments must have an identifiable name attached, or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

To submit comments electronically, visit: https://cara.ecosystem-management.org/Public//CommentInput?Project=54674. The link is located on the left side of the project website.

To submit via mail or hand delivery, send to: Wild and Scenic River Planning Comments; 70220 E. Highway 26; Zigzag, OR 97049 or BLM Northwest Oregon District, Wild and Scenic River Planning Comments (Attn: Whitney Wirthlin); 1717 Fabry Road SE; Salem, OR 97306.

For more information, contact Jennie O’Connor Card, team leader, at (406) 522-2537 or jennie.oconnorcard@usda.gov.


Source information: Mt. Hood National Forest (press release).

Devils Staircase, rivers receive new protections under Wilderness, Wild & Scenic Rivers acts

Devils Staircase waterfall, in the newly-designated Devils Staircase Wilderness. The wilderness is on a remote part of the Siuslaw National Forest, and has no officially recognized trailheads or access points. USDA Forest Service photo (undated file photo).

Corvallis, Ore. – March 18, 2019 – With the March 12 signing of the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act, President Donald Trump authorized designation of the Devils Staircase Wilderness and three Wild and Scenic rivers on the Siuslaw National Forest, along with number of other land conservation actions across the country.

These Congressional designations recognize the unique value and wild character of these special places and protect them in perpetuity.

Covering more than 30,000 acres, Devils Staircase Wilderness is a remote and rugged pocket of national forest located east of Reedsport, Ore.

Wasson and Franklin creeks, which received two of the river designations, flow through the this area to the Umpqua River.

The area has no trails, nor official access points.

The challenging terrain and decades-ago acknowledgement that the area was unsuitable for timber production is why Devils Staircase is one of the few remaining old growth refuges in the Oregon Coast Range.

This pristine tract of forest provides outstanding habitat for northern spotted owl, marbled murrelet, and coastal Coho salmon, all federally threatened species, along with other fish and wildlife.

“The Forest Service long ago recognized the ecological importance this area has in Coast Range,” Robert Sanchez, Siuslaw National Forest Supervisor, said. “With the new wilderness and wild and scenic designations, we will continue to manage this area as we have been, with a light touch that promotes the natural processes at work there and with minimal sign of man’s influence.”

The third Wild and Scenic River designation is a portion of the Nestucca River, which flows through the north end of the Siuslaw National Forest on the Hebo Ranger District.

The Wilderness Act of 1964 established a legal definition of wilderness and created a means by which Congress can ensure the wild character of special places will be preserved for future generations.

The Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968 established a tool for ensuring rivers with outstanding natural, cultural, or recreational value remain free-flowing, and that protections are in place to preserve the values for which it was designated, for the enjoyment by future generations.

More info:

Siuslaw National Forest

Wilderness Act

Wild & Scenic Rivers


Source information: USDA Forest Service – Siuslaw National Forest (press release)