Category Archives: Job Corps

Field Notes: Strengthening roots through LatinX communities outreach

USDA Forest Service staff from Mt. Hood National Forest, Resource Assistants Leslie Garcia and Kira McConnell, and VIVE Northwest participants pose for a group photo during a stewardship event at Zig Zig Ranger Station April 6, 2019. Courtesy photo VIVE Northwest.

As the Hispanic/LatinX Communications and Community Engagement Specialist for the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Regional Office in Portland, Ore., I’ve been able to connect with many organizations and community leaders that are working to ensure members of LatinX communities feel comfortable and welcomed in outdoor spaces.

It’s important to understand the backgrounds and diverse cultures within the LatinX communities.

The ability to provide bilingual educational and nature-based programs is critical to educating all populations about the importance of public lands.

There is a need for diversity, equity, inclusion and cultural relevance when trying to engage communities in the outdoors, and the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region has had several opportunities to be part of community engagements led by these organizations.

Their work is not only helping the Forest Service meet a need for outdoor and conservation education in these communities, it’s also helped Forest Service employees recognize the importance of intentional, meaningful and culturally relevant outreach.

VIVE Northwest participants join Resource Assistant Leslie Garcia in clearing ivy on Bear Creek during a stewardship event April 6, 2019 on Mt. Hood National Forest. USDA Forest Service photo by Resource Assistant Kira McConnell.
VIVE Northwest participants join Resource Assistant Leslie Garcia in clearing ivy on Bear Creek during a stewardship event April 6, 2019 on Mt. Hood National Forest. USDA Forest Service photo by Resource Assistant Kira McConnell.

Founded in 2016, Vive NW was created to provide a solution to the lack of diversity in the outdoors through powerful and enriching experiences here in the Pacific Northwest.

VIVE connects Latino communities to the outdoors by providing powerful and enriching experiences offered through nature. The end goal, Diversifying the Outdoors.

In early spring, VIVE Northwest partnered with Mt. Hood National Forest for a stewardship day.

Families, children, friends, and LatinX communities members from all parts of Portland met at the Zig Zag Ranger Station to help clear ivy and plant a hundred trees in pouring rain.

Photograph of young VIVE Northwest participant planting a tree with Resource Assistant Leslie Garcia at Bear Creek on Mt. Hood National Forest, Ore. April 6, 2019. Courtesy photo by VIVE Northwest.
Photograph of young VIVE Northwest participant planting a tree with Resource Assistant Leslie Garcia at Bear Creek on Mt. Hood National Forest, Ore. April 6, 2019. Courtesy photo by VIVE Northwest.

This photo is one of my favorites from this event. Besides this being such a great picture, the memories attached to it truly make me smile! I love that it was captured, because of all the moments leading up to the taking of this photo.

While we were all working together to clear the ivy, I had the opportunity to meet this young girl, along with her mother and older sister. I had a very heart-felt conversation with the mom. I was curious to know how they’d heard of the event, and what they thought of it so far.

Her response was one I could immediately relate to, and sparked so many memories from my own life and the lives of my family.

In her hometown of Michoacán, Mexico (which is where my mom is from), she would help her family en el campo de aguacates (avocado fields) as a young kid. She told me how much she missed doing this type of work. She was happy that she could share a similar stewardship experience with her daughters and that organizations like VIVE Northwest were organizing these types of opportunities.

I grew up hearing this same story from my mom. Although I don’t remember much of that time, I know I, also, roamed the campo de aguacates in Michoacan as a child. Now this is shared stewardship!

Not everyone will have the same positive experience or interest in doing field work, but acknowledging the stories behind others experiences in stewardship work allows us to see the roots that connect us all, together, to the land. 

Latino Outdoors is a Latino-led organization that aims to inspire, connect, and engage Latino communities in the outdoors by embracing cultura y familia as part of the outdoor narrative, ensuring Latino history and heritage are represented and appreciated alongside those of other communities and cultures.

Members of the Latino Outdoors Seattle Chapter with Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie Youth and Community Engagement Resource Assistant Kelsey Chun and Latinx Resource Assistant Leslie Garcia at Snoqualmie Pass March 10, 2019. Courtesy photo by Latino Outdoors.
Members of the Latino Outdoors Seattle Chapter with Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie Youth and Community Engagement Resource Assistant Kelsey Chun and Latinx Resource Assistant Leslie Garcia at Snoqualmie Pass March 10, 2019. Courtesy photo by Latino Outdoors.

In March, I joined Kelsy Chun, Youth and Community Engagement Resource Assistant for Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, on a snowshoeing expedition with Latino Outdoors Seattle Chapter at Snoqualmie Pass.

At that time, Latino Outdoors Seattle was the only active Latino Outdoors chapter in the Pacific Northwest.

It was amazing to see such a fun group of people enjoying a day out in the snow. It was my first time snowshoeing, just like several of the participants, but sharing the first time experience even as a facilitator was truly amazing!

I was so inspired, I’m currently serving an Outings Leader for the Latino Outdoors Portland, Oregon Chapter.

Members Latino Outdoors Portland Chapter pose with outings leaders, members, a State Park Ranger a Forest Service employee, and an interns during a conservation education activity at Tryon Creek State Park, Ore. July 21, 2019. USDA Forest Service photo.
Members Latino Outdoors Portland Chapter pose with outings leaders, members, a State Park Ranger a Forest Service employee, and an interns during a conservation education activity at Tryon Creek State Park, Ore. July 21, 2019. USDA Forest Service photo.

On July 21st, for the last day of Latino Conservation Week, our chapter organized a nature hike at Tyron Creek.

The hike was led by a state park ranger, and Forest Service employees joined us to share Leave No Trace principles and engage with the community members.

Serving communities often means meeting them where they are and where they are interested in being. Local parks can be a place for all nature lovers and conservationists to come together.

The chapter partnered with the Forest Service for an outing at Mt. Hood, their first trip on National Forest, earlier this month.

My position (a short-term Resource Assistant position supporting the USDA Forest Service’s Regional Office, provided through an agency partnership with Northwest Youth Corps), has been an incredible opportunity to connect and work alongside these organizations, and others.

I’ve been able to take part in new activities and see new places, but what I will cherish is the sense of culture and community that was present during those moments.


Source information: Leslie Garcia recently completed a 14-month assignment supporting the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region Office of Communications and Community Engagement and its Diversity, Equity and Inclusion outreach programs through an agency partnership with NW Youth Corps. For more information about education and employment opportunities for young people, including the Youth Conservation Corps, Resource Assistant Program, internships and fellowships, visit https://www.fs.fed.us/working-with-us/opportunities-for-young-people.

August is Fire Hire season for Forest Service in WA, OR

Images of an aircraft dropping fire retardant, a fire truck and crew, fire personnel in nomex and protective gear reviewing a map in the field, a firefighter spraying water on a fire from a hose, a firefighter hand crew, and a firefighter lighting dry grass using a drip torch. Text: 2019 Fire Hire, USDA Forest Service - Pacific Northwest Region.

PORTLAND, Ore. (July 31, 2019) — The annual “fire hire” hiring event for the USDA Forest Service – Pacific Northwest Region opens Aug. 1, 2019.

The Forest Service is looking for committed, hardworking, highly-skilled employees to support wildfire suppression, fuels reduction and other fire management work on 17 National Forests in Oregon and Washington.

The fire and aviation program features rewarding opportunities for candidates with seasonal wildland firefighting experience to pursue challenging, full-time positions with the agency.

The agency uses the centralized, annual “fire hire” process for hiring most positions in the region’s permanent fire management workforce.

Specialized opportunities being offered include dispatch, engine crew positions, fuels technicians, hand crew members, helitack crew members, hotshot crew remembers, smokejumpers, and fire prevention and education specialists.

Opportunities will be posted at www.usajobs.gov, with an application window of Aug. 1-28, 2019.

Vacancy announcements for seasonal opportunities during the summer, 2020 wildland fire season – which includes the majority of the region’s entry-level and trainee fire management opportunities – will be posted to USAJobs in September, 2019.

“Fire Hire” timeline:

  • Aug. 1, 2019: Vacancy announcements are posted to USAJobs.
  • Aug. 28, 2019: Application deadline, 7:59 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time (10:59 p.m. EDT, or 11:59 EST). Applicants are encouraged to read all vacancy announcements carefully prior to applying, and ensure all required documents are included with their submission. Applicants are also encouraged to apply for multiple locations (where they would accept a position if offered), even if positions for certain locations are not listed as vacant, as vacancies may occur during the hiring process and could be filled during Selection Week.
  • Oct. 15-31, 2019: Supervisory Reference Checks, and Subject Matter Expert evaluations occur during these weeks. Please ensure your references are notified of this and they are available at the email address (preferred) or phone number provided on your application.
  • Nov. 4-22, 2019: Selection week. Representatives from each forest will make recommendations for hiring, and candidates selected will be notified by a Forest Service representative by phone. Those not selected should check their USAJobs account for status updates. During the selection week candidates will be given 4 hours to respond to voicemails or emails from the recommending officials. It is highly encouraged candidates plan be available via phone during this time!
  • March, 2020: Earliest possible effective date for new hires.

Note: Where Interagency Fire Program Management (IFPM) and Forest Service – Fire Program Management (FS-FPM) qualifications are required, these qualifications must be met prior to the closing date on the vacancy being applied for. Applicants with relevant fire certifications or experience must provide a current copy of their IQCS Master Record, where indicated in the announcement, to meet qualification requirements for positions with IQCS requirements.

For more information: Visit https://go.usa.gov/xyfx8.

Images of an aircraft dropping fire retardant, a fire truck and crew, fire personnel in nomex and protective gear reviewing a map in the field, a firefighter spraying water on a fire from a hose, a firefighter hand crew, and a firefighter lighting dry grass using a drip torch. Text: 2019 Fire Hire, USDA Forest Service - Pacific Northwest Region. Apply on www.usajobs.gov August 1-28.
The USDA Forest Service – Pacific Northwest Region’s next “Fire Hire” hiring event is Aug. 1-28, 2019 at https://www.usajobs.gov. Applicants are encouraged to apply for current and potential vacancies at all locations they are interested in being considered for, for a variety of permanent, full-time positions supporting fire and aviation management programs on 17 National Forests in Washington and Oregon, with projected start dates in spring-summer, 2020.

In the news: Wolf Creek Job Corps firefighters assist rescue flight

On June 21, 2019, Wolf Creek Job Corps student students assisted a REACH-8 Air Medical Services crew evacuate an injured motorist from the Umpqua National Forest. At left, a satellite image of the students creating a light ring to identify a field where the helicopter would land. At right, students involved in the rescue post for a photo. USDA Forest service photos.

Firefighting students at the Wolf Creek Job Corps recently called on their emergency response skills to aid an injured motorist.

Members of the center’s staff called 911 after a second motorist drove 20 miles to the center to report a vehicle crash on the Umpqua National Forest. The injured motorist was transported by ambulance to the center, and a REACH flight helicopter was called in.

“Normally the ground unit that is requesting us sets up a pre-determined landing area or has a local fire department assist with this task,” Brittany Countryman, a REACH flight crew member and registered nurse, wrote in a letter to the center’s firefighters and staff. “On this very dark night there was no one available to help us land or locate a safe place to land. Troy and the group of young men that met us were fast; we made the decision to try to land at the Job Corps field and within minutes there was a well-lit area to guide us in.”

June 21, 2019 image of Wolf Creek Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center firefighters gathered in formation on the Wolf Creek Job Corps baseball field to assist a REACH-8 Air Medical Services Agusta A109 Power helicopter land and take off safely during a nighttime emergency airlift. USDA Forest service photo.

The student firefighters gathered in formation to simulate a ring of helicopter landing zone lights that allowed the air medical services crew to land safely on the center’s baseball field, which served as the extraction point. They also helped off-load the stabilized patient from the ground ambulance, and transported her across the Little River to the helicopter.

“Wolf Creek fire students are trained to respond to all risk incidents under the incident command structure,” Gabe Wishart, the center’s director, said.  “Our students’ ability to respond under stress, follow instruction, and to work safely in atypical situations such as this medical evacuation demonstrates the effectiveness of that training.” 

Full story, via USDA Forest Service: https://www.fs.fed.us/inside-fs/wolf-creek-job-corps-firefighters-step-plate-during-nighttime-medical-air-evacuation

On June 21, 2019, Wolf Creek Job Corps student students assisted a REACH-8 Air Medical Services crew evacuate an injured motorist from the Umpqua National Forest. USDA Forest service photo.