Category Archives: Hiking

Field Notes: Strengthening roots through LatinX communities outreach

USDA Forest Service staff from Mt. Hood National Forest, Resource Assistants Leslie Garcia and Kira McConnell, and VIVE Northwest participants pose for a group photo during a stewardship event at Zig Zig Ranger Station April 6, 2019. Courtesy photo VIVE Northwest.

As the Hispanic/LatinX Communications and Community Engagement Specialist for the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Regional Office in Portland, Ore., I’ve been able to connect with many organizations and community leaders that are working to ensure members of LatinX communities feel comfortable and welcomed in outdoor spaces.

It’s important to understand the backgrounds and diverse cultures within the LatinX communities.

The ability to provide bilingual educational and nature-based programs is critical to educating all populations about the importance of public lands.

There is a need for diversity, equity, inclusion and cultural relevance when trying to engage communities in the outdoors, and the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region has had several opportunities to be part of community engagements led by these organizations.

Their work is not only helping the Forest Service meet a need for outdoor and conservation education in these communities, it’s also helped Forest Service employees recognize the importance of intentional, meaningful and culturally relevant outreach.

VIVE Northwest participants join Resource Assistant Leslie Garcia in clearing ivy on Bear Creek during a stewardship event April 6, 2019 on Mt. Hood National Forest. USDA Forest Service photo by Resource Assistant Kira McConnell.
VIVE Northwest participants join Resource Assistant Leslie Garcia in clearing ivy on Bear Creek during a stewardship event April 6, 2019 on Mt. Hood National Forest. USDA Forest Service photo by Resource Assistant Kira McConnell.

Founded in 2016, Vive NW was created to provide a solution to the lack of diversity in the outdoors through powerful and enriching experiences here in the Pacific Northwest.

VIVE connects Latino communities to the outdoors by providing powerful and enriching experiences offered through nature. The end goal, Diversifying the Outdoors.

In early spring, VIVE Northwest partnered with Mt. Hood National Forest for a stewardship day.

Families, children, friends, and LatinX communities members from all parts of Portland met at the Zig Zag Ranger Station to help clear ivy and plant a hundred trees in pouring rain.

Photograph of young VIVE Northwest participant planting a tree with Resource Assistant Leslie Garcia at Bear Creek on Mt. Hood National Forest, Ore. April 6, 2019. Courtesy photo by VIVE Northwest.
Photograph of young VIVE Northwest participant planting a tree with Resource Assistant Leslie Garcia at Bear Creek on Mt. Hood National Forest, Ore. April 6, 2019. Courtesy photo by VIVE Northwest.

This photo is one of my favorites from this event. Besides this being such a great picture, the memories attached to it truly make me smile! I love that it was captured, because of all the moments leading up to the taking of this photo.

While we were all working together to clear the ivy, I had the opportunity to meet this young girl, along with her mother and older sister. I had a very heart-felt conversation with the mom. I was curious to know how they’d heard of the event, and what they thought of it so far.

Her response was one I could immediately relate to, and sparked so many memories from my own life and the lives of my family.

In her hometown of Michoacán, Mexico (which is where my mom is from), she would help her family en el campo de aguacates (avocado fields) as a young kid. She told me how much she missed doing this type of work. She was happy that she could share a similar stewardship experience with her daughters and that organizations like VIVE Northwest were organizing these types of opportunities.

I grew up hearing this same story from my mom. Although I don’t remember much of that time, I know I, also, roamed the campo de aguacates in Michoacan as a child. Now this is shared stewardship!

Not everyone will have the same positive experience or interest in doing field work, but acknowledging the stories behind others experiences in stewardship work allows us to see the roots that connect us all, together, to the land. 

Latino Outdoors is a Latino-led organization that aims to inspire, connect, and engage Latino communities in the outdoors by embracing cultura y familia as part of the outdoor narrative, ensuring Latino history and heritage are represented and appreciated alongside those of other communities and cultures.

Members of the Latino Outdoors Seattle Chapter with Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie Youth and Community Engagement Resource Assistant Kelsey Chun and Latinx Resource Assistant Leslie Garcia at Snoqualmie Pass March 10, 2019. Courtesy photo by Latino Outdoors.
Members of the Latino Outdoors Seattle Chapter with Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie Youth and Community Engagement Resource Assistant Kelsey Chun and Latinx Resource Assistant Leslie Garcia at Snoqualmie Pass March 10, 2019. Courtesy photo by Latino Outdoors.

In March, I joined Kelsy Chun, Youth and Community Engagement Resource Assistant for Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, on a snowshoeing expedition with Latino Outdoors Seattle Chapter at Snoqualmie Pass.

At that time, Latino Outdoors Seattle was the only active Latino Outdoors chapter in the Pacific Northwest.

It was amazing to see such a fun group of people enjoying a day out in the snow. It was my first time snowshoeing, just like several of the participants, but sharing the first time experience even as a facilitator was truly amazing!

I was so inspired, I’m currently serving an Outings Leader for the Latino Outdoors Portland, Oregon Chapter.

Members Latino Outdoors Portland Chapter pose with outings leaders, members, a State Park Ranger a Forest Service employee, and an interns during a conservation education activity at Tryon Creek State Park, Ore. July 21, 2019. USDA Forest Service photo.
Members Latino Outdoors Portland Chapter pose with outings leaders, members, a State Park Ranger a Forest Service employee, and an interns during a conservation education activity at Tryon Creek State Park, Ore. July 21, 2019. USDA Forest Service photo.

On July 21st, for the last day of Latino Conservation Week, our chapter organized a nature hike at Tyron Creek.

The hike was led by a state park ranger, and Forest Service employees joined us to share Leave No Trace principles and engage with the community members.

Serving communities often means meeting them where they are and where they are interested in being. Local parks can be a place for all nature lovers and conservationists to come together.

The chapter partnered with the Forest Service for an outing at Mt. Hood, their first trip on National Forest, earlier this month.

My position (a short-term Resource Assistant position supporting the USDA Forest Service’s Regional Office, provided through an agency partnership with Northwest Youth Corps), has been an incredible opportunity to connect and work alongside these organizations, and others.

I’ve been able to take part in new activities and see new places, but what I will cherish is the sense of culture and community that was present during those moments.


Source information: Leslie Garcia recently completed a 14-month assignment supporting the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region Office of Communications and Community Engagement and its Diversity, Equity and Inclusion outreach programs through an agency partnership with NW Youth Corps. For more information about education and employment opportunities for young people, including the Youth Conservation Corps, Resource Assistant Program, internships and fellowships, visit https://www.fs.fed.us/working-with-us/opportunities-for-young-people.

Postcard: Ramona Falls (no exaggeration required)

A hiker stands on the footbridge at the base of Ramona Falls, Mt. Hood National Forest, Ore. Courtesy photo by Catherine "Cat" Caruso.

Like many Pacific Northwest residents, I didn’t actually grow up here. I often call myself a “northeasterner by upbringing, northwesterner by choice.” While I know firsthand the way one’s hometown maintains a powerful hold on their heart, I also never tire of finding reasons to love my adopted home.

So, when one of my younger brothers came to visit this month, I steered him towards the travel and tourism kiosk located in the baggage claim area at Portland International Airport. As an anime fan, I thought he’d be especially delighted by Travel Oregon’s colorful “Oregon. Only slightly exaggerated” campaign… and he was! But even my heart skipped a beat when I recognized one of the locations in the brochure as Ramona Falls.

I’d hiked there just two weeks earlier.

An image from the “Oregon, Only slightly exaggerated,” ad campaign (Travel Oregon)

It’s as beautiful as what you see in this illustration.

The area around the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, which includes the Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Hood National Forest, is said to have the largest concentration of waterfalls in the United States.

Oregon’s most-famous waterfall is probably Multnomah Falls. My brother and I made a point to visit it during his trip; a spectacular sight, water plunging hundreds of feet to the pool below. It draws visitors from around the world, daily.

But to me, Ramona Falls is more beautiful.

The view looking up at the top of Ramona Falls. Courtesy photo by Catherine “Cat” Caruso.

Before I go any further, I want to share some words of warning: Ramona Falls is located in a wilderness area.

Never go into a wilderness without the ‘10 Outdoors Essentials!”

Outdoor Eseentials: Be prepared and carry these essential items any time you head out into the outdoors! 1. Appropriate footwear. 2. Printed map. 3. Extra water. 4. Extra food. 5. Extra clothes. 6. Emergency items. 7. First aid kit. 8. Knife or multi-purpose tool. 9. Backpack. 10. Sun hat, sunscreen, sunglasses.
Outdoor Eseentials: Be prepared and carry these essential items any time you head out into the outdoors! 1. Appropriate footwear. 2. Printed map. 3. Extra water. 4. Extra food. 5. Extra clothes. 6. Emergency items. 7. First aid kit. 8. Knife or multi-purpose tool. 9. Backpack. 10. Sun hat, sunscreen, sunglasses.

During my hike, I encountered many day hikers who seemed to take the lesson of 2017’s Eagle Creek fire, which occurred in the nearby Columbia River Gorge, to heart. During that fire, more than 100 day use visitors were stranded on the trail, and forced to undertake a long, difficult hike to safety.

But I also saw many people who not well-prepared, carrying only a bottle of water and whatever fit in their pockets.

As you approach the Sandy River, the trail is clearly marked with signs that warn about the dangers of crossing. Pay attention: If you can’t safely secure your child or pet to you and carry them across an improvised footbridge mad from a fallen tree or log without losing your balance, don’t try!

I’m sharing this from my own experience: Many people bring their dogs on this hike; I assumed I’d one of them, and it was a mistake. While I believed my young pup had done enough work on a balance beam to handle a log crossing, I failed to account for how much he likes to swim. While the current was safe – though, still quite strong – against the body of an adult human, it was much too deep and too swift for my Siberian Husky. Intellectually, I’d known the river can be dangerous, emotionally, it left me far more nervous for some of the small children I saw on this trail after I’d jumped into the current myself and fought to haul 65 pounds of wriggling, wet dog to the shore.

Shortly after this photo was taken, he jumped into the river for the second time. He’s cuter than he is bright. He’s also no longer invited on hikes with unimproved water crossings. Courtesy photo by Catherine “Cat” Caruso.

Signs that warn about the dangers of river crossings are posted alongside this trail for a reason: hikers have died here, after flash floods caused by heavy rainfall, in 2004 and 2014.

It’s easy be lulled into a false sense of security when you see others navigate a risky situation successfully; I know, I made the same mistake.

My advice is to read trip reports, check weather listings, and use more caution than you think you need to. Just because nothing seems to have gone wrong for many others, doesn’t mean it can’t.

Still: At the right time of year, when the river crossing is approached with appropriate caution and care, the Ramona Falls loop trail is a beautiful hike.

The 7-to-8 mile loop has a relatively gentle grade, with a cumulative 1000 feet of elevation gain.

The trail culminates with a spectacular view from the base of Ramona Falls, which really do look like something out of a fairy tale; truly, they need no exaggeration.

Children play at the base of the “real” Ramona Falls; Mt. Hood National Forest, Ore., which needs no exaggeration. Courtesy photo by Catherine “Cat” Caruso.

More information:

Ramona Falls trail # 797 – Mt. Hood National Forest:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/mthood/recarea/?recid=53460

The Enchanting Mt. Hood and Columbia River Gorge – Travel Oregon https://traveloregon.com/only-slightly-exaggerated/the-enchanting-mt-hood-and-columbia-river-gorge/


Source information: Catherine “Cat” Caruso works in the USDA Forest Service – Pacific Northwest Region Office of Communications and Community Engagement. When she’s not editing the “Your Northwest Forests” blog, she’s usually shopping for fur-repellent office wear. She considers her outdoorsmanship skills to be “average,” which means there’s a 50 percent chance yours are better – but also, an equal chance that they’re worse.

Field Notes: Backpacking Gifford Pinchot NF with Outdoor Asian

Participants during an Outdoor Asian hiking trip on Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. The trip was supported in part by the USDA Forest Service. Courtesy photo by Deepak Awari.

Jay Horita is a Youth & Community Engagement Specialist for Northwest Youth Corps, supporting the USDA Forest Service – Pacific Northwest Region. Here, he shares notes from a weekend backpacking experience with Outdoor Asian, a nonprofit whose goal is to encourage and study the participation of Asian and Pacific Islanders in the outdoors.

Participants pose for a group photo during an Outdoor Asian hiking trip on Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. The trip was supported in part by the USDA Forest Service. Courtesy photo by Deepak Awari.
Participants pose for a group photo during an Outdoor Asian hiking trip on Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. The trip was supported in part by the USDA Forest Service. From left: Jay Horita, Alvin Loong, Alice Cao, Chris Liu, Yewah Lau, Mumtz Mesania, Reina Miyamoto, Natalie Balkam, Deeshi Donnelly, Cheryl Truong, and Depak Awari. Courtesy photo provided by Deepak Awari.

On Friday, August 30th 2019, eleven members of the Outdoor Asian community from the Oregon and Washington chapters drove up a pothole-ridden and rocky Forest Service road to the Glacier View Trailhead in the Gifford-Pinchot National Forest.

After a hot meal of noodles, we hit the sleeping bags to prepare for the next day’s backpacking adventure. 

Participants hike a trail downhill during an Outdoor Asian hiking trip on Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. The trip was supported in part by the USDA Forest Service. Courtesy photo by Deepak Awari.
Participants hike a trail downhill during an Outdoor Asian hiking trip on Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. The trip was supported in part by the USDA Forest Service. Courtesy photo by Deepak Awari.

This trip was the very first of its kind for Outdoor Asian in many ways: the first backpacking trip, the first multi-chapter collaboration event, the first trip occurring in wilderness areas of two public land agencies.

Trip leaders Chris Liu and I spent much time planning a positive, fun, challenging, and educational backpacking adventure for eleven Outdoor Asians. 

Participants prepared food, including some traditional asian dishes, during an Outdoor Asian hiking trip on Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. The trip was supported in part by the USDA Forest Service. Courtesy photo by Deepak Awari.
Participants prepared food, including some traditional asian dishes, during an Outdoor Asian hiking trip on Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. From left: Chris Liu, Reina Miyamoto, Natalie Balkam, and Deepak Awari. The trip was supported in part by the USDA Forest Service. Courtesy photo provided by Deepak Awari.

We deliberately chose a diverse meal plan, which ranged from instant noodles to elaborate dahl and roti from scratch (rolled out on our Nalgene bottles!), to showcase the vast diversity of Asian backpacking food options.

Our goal was to ensure the participants realized they don’t have to give up their culinary heritage on trips into the back country! Thinking back to my early years in back country adventuring, I remember trips where all I ate were dehydrated mashed potatoes and tortillas, so it was great to treat everyone to familiar foods. We even had a rare tea blend, a Yuzu Green tea, to enjoy throughout the trip. The food brought us closer together, helping make the trip feel more like a family adventure.

Participants get a lesson in reading topographical maps during an Outdoor Asian hiking trip on Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. The trip was supported in part by the USDA Forest Service. Courtesy photo by Deepak Awari.
Participants get a lesson in reading topographical maps during an Outdoor Asian hiking trip on Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. From left: Jay Horita, Yewah Lau, Mumtaz Mesania, Reina Miyamoto, Natalie Balkam, Alice Cao, Cheryl Truong, Chris Liu, and Alvin Loong. Courtesy photo by Deepak Awari.

Besides giving everyone a great backcountry experience, Chris and I also wanted to talk about a range of important topics from Leave-No-Trace principles to Wilderness First Aid. Some even had the chance to practice wilderness first aid by patching each others’ blisters and hot spots!

Participants compare trail footwear during an Outdoor Asian hiking trip on Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. The trip was supported in part by the USDA Forest Service. Courtesy photo by Yewah Lau.
Participants compare trail footwear during an Outdoor Asian hiking trip on Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. The trip was supported in part by the USDA Forest Service. Courtesy photo by Yewah Lau.

Our group included seasoned public land stewards, from biologists to district rangers, who shared their experiences working for the USDA Forest Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Park Service.

Those uninitiated to public land management got a crash course on the differences between National Forest land (where we started the hike) and National Park land (where we ended it).

Participants during an Outdoor Asian hiking trip on Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. The trip was supported in part by the USDA Forest Service. Courtesy photo by Deepak Awari.
Participants during an Outdoor Asian hiking trip on Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. The trip was supported in part by the USDA Forest Service. Courtesy photo by Deepak Awari.

Crossing the boundary from the Glacier View Wilderness into Mt. Rainier Wilderness was a special moment!

For me, the ultimate trip highlight was arriving at the Gobblers Knob fire lookout tower, where Mt. Rainier (or Tahoma, one of many Native American names for the mountain) peaked its glacier-covered summit through the clouds.

The mountain was spectacular and humbling. The lakes and meadows we visited were calming. The stars gave us perspective. The wilderness gave us the best backdrop to share our experiences as Outdoor Asians and develop our connection to a life outdoors.

Outdoor Asian participants pose atop a rocky outcrop during an August, 2019 backpacking trip through Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. Courtesy photo by Yewah Lau.
Outdoor Asian participants pose atop a rocky outcrop during an August, 2019 backpacking trip through Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mt. Rainier National Park in Washington. Courtesy photo by Yewah Lau.

In future trips, we hope to address how all public lands (indeed all lands in the Americas) were cared for by the diverse tribes, groups, and nations of Native Americans; and still are, in many places.

Most importantly, we celebrated our shared connection to the land across all cultures. The Forest Service is, like most things, ephemeral in comparison to the mountain and its landscapes.

Hiking safely with mountain goats

A man with Mountain Goat on Mt Ellinor Trail in the Olympic National Forest in Washington. May 4, 2016. USDA Forest Service photo. For Mountain Goat Safety Guidelines: www.fs.usda.gov/detail/olympic/home/?cid=stelprdb5412239

How does one hike safely with mountain goats?

Step one: Back away, slowly.

Catching a glimpse of a goat perched high on the side of a craggy hillside or cliff is a welcome sight to many hikers and other recreational users of Your Northwest Forests.

But as the number of people using the forests increases, there’s also an increased risk of human-wildlife encounters that pose a threat to both humans and goats.

Three mountain goats are harnessed to a hoist line as they are transported below a helicopter to a handler, who waits to unharness the goats in the bed of a flatbed truck. The goats were sedated, blindfolded, then brought to this landing zone for veterinarian care prior to transport National Forests in the north Cascades mountains for release in native habitat. National Park Service Photo John Gussman.
Three mountain goats are harnessed to a hoist line as they are transported below a helicopter to a handler, who waits to unharness the goats in the bed of a flatbed truck. The goats were sedated, blindfolded, then brought to this landing zone for veterinarian care prior to transport National Forests in the north Cascades mountains for release in native habitat. National Park Service photo by John Gussman.

At places like Mount Ellinor on the Olympic National Forest, where the goats don’t naturally range (they were introduced to the area by hunters), salt they need to live is scarce.

Goats have been known to seek out humans, sometimes aggressively, in search of their food, sweat, and even urine.

In other forests, some mountain goats have grown accustomed to curious people getting too close and lost their fear of humans, with similar results.

While several agencies are working to relocate some goats to areas where they naturally range, it’s important to prevent all wild goats from becoming habituated to human contact, so they can remain wild without posing an undue threat to humans’ safety.

To protect wildlife from negative impacts of human contact:

  • Keep your distance! Stay at least 50 yards away from all mountain goats – about half the length of a football field.
  • If a mountain goat approaches, slowly move away from it to keep a safe distance.
  • If it continues to approach, try to scare it off by yelling, waving a piece of clothing, or throwing rocks.
  • Never surround, crowd, chase, or follow a mountain goat.
  • Do not feed mountain goats (or allow them to lick your skin, clothes, or gear, which may have absorbed salt from your sweat).
  • If you need to urinate while hiking, move far from the trail to avoid leaving concentrations of salts and minerals trailside, or contributing to the accumulation of minerals in one place.

Source information: Olympic National Forest (website)

In the News: Ten Outdoor Essentials

Shandra Terry, USDA Forest Service, shares the Ten Outdoor Essentials with Tra'Renee Chambers on KATU-TV 2's "Afternoon Live" program, June 4, 2019. Full story: https://katu.com/afternoon-live/lifestyle-health/national-forest-essentials

The “10 Outdoor Essentials” should be second-nature for anyone engaging in responsible recreation on public lands.

Yet every day, people head outdoors unprepared.

Don’t do it!

The “essentials” list, recognized by everyone from scouts to mountaineers, is an easy way to make sure you’re prepared for anything that comes your way while enjoying the great outdoors.

Can you wear flipflops in the woods? Sure – but make sure you also have sneakers or boots in your pack, in case you get caught outdoors longer than planned.

Speaking of which, have a plan!

Make sure someone knows where you are going and how long you will be gone, so they can sound the alarm if you don’t return when expected.

Shandra Terry, from the USDA Forest Service – Pacific Northwest Region’s Office of Communications and Community Engagement, shared these and other essential outdoor tips with KATU-2 Afternoon Live host Tra’Renee Chambers in Portland, Ore. June 4.

Full story: Watch the KATU-2 interview, below (or, visit https://katu.com/afternoon-live/lifestyle-health/national-forest-essentials).

Help us spread the word! Print or save the “Ten Outdoor Essentials” flyer and share it with everyone who enjoys public lands... or wants to start!

Outdoor Essentials: Be prepared and carry these essential items any time you head out into the outdoors! 1. Appropriate footwear. 2. Printed map. 3. Extra water. 4. Extra food. 5. Extra clothes. 6. Emergency items. 7. First aid kit. 8. Knife or multi-purpose tool. 9. Backpack. 10. Sun hat, sunscreen, sunglasses.
Outdoor Essentials: Be prepared and carry these essential items any time you head out into the outdoors! 1. Appropriate footwear. 2. Printed map. 3. Extra water. 4. Extra food. 5. Extra clothes. 6. Emergency items. 7. First aid kit. 8. Knife or multi-purpose tool. 9. Backpack. 10. Sun hat, sunscreen, sunglasses. USDA Forest Service graphic, Sept. 2018

Boulder Cave reopens for summer; bat protection protocol in place

Townsend's big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii), in a July 20, 2011 file photo by Ann Froschauer, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS)

NACHES, Wash. (June 3, 2019)Boulder Cave, a popular highlight for visitors to the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, will opened for the 2019 summer season May 24. Boulder Cave, Boulder Cave Day Use Site, and the Boulder Barrier Free Trail will be open 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily through Sept. 20, 2019.

The cave is home to Townsend’s big-eared bat, which is listed as a sensitive species in Washington and Oregon.

Bats are susceptible to White Nose Syndrome, a deadly disease triggered by a fungal infection that can kill entire bat colonies by disrupting their winter hibernation.

A USDA Forest Service interpreter will be on site at Boulder Cave to provide information about the cave and explain the White Nose Syndrome prevention protocol visitors must follow as they enter the cave., which include brushing and scraping off the soles of their shoes when entering and leaving the cave.

We’re all about providing great recreation on public lands while minimizing harmful impacts to wildlife,” Joan St. Hilaire, a USDA Forest Service wildlife biologist, said. “To help prevent the spread of White Nose Syndrome, visitors are asked to brush off and scrape their shoes on an astro turf carpet prior to entering and leaving the cave.”

Cave visitors are also encouraged to wash clothing, outerwear, and gear between visits to different caves or other places bats congregate.

When visiting Boulder Cave, all visitors are required to carry a flashlight. A good pair of walking shoes and layered clothing are also recommended. Pets are not allowed.

“We can all do our part by limiting all noise, staying on the trail, not touching cave walls, and keeping lights off the ceiling (to avoid disturbing the bats),” St. Hilaire said.

The cave is closed annually from September through May to provide a secure refuge during the bats’ hibernation period.

A footbridge leads into Boulder Cave west of the community of Naches, Washington on the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest in an undated USDA Forest Service file photo.

Source information: Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest (press release)

In the News: How to summit Mt. Hood safely

View of Mt. Hood from Timothy Lake with hillside trees and forest in the foreground, Mt Hood National Forest, Jan. 18, 2018. USDA Forest Service photo.

We talk a lot about the 10 Outdoor Essentials here at Your Northwest Forests, and there’s a reason for it- again and again, we’ve seen that when the unexpected occurs, just a little preparation can make the difference between an uncomfortable experience and a life-threatening emergency.

That goes even more so for technical climbing, such as the increasingly popular snow- and ice- covered climbs approaching the summit of mountains located just beyond the Pacific Northwest’s urban areas, like Mt. Rainier and Mt. Hood.

This KGW-TV story, produced with assistance from volunteers from Portland Mountain Rescue, does a great job showing why the mountain appeals to so many – and why such climbs are so dangerous, even when many other visitors seem to be using the same route and summer weather is imminent.

Full story, via KGW.com: https://www.kgw.com/article/news/local/key-safety-tips-for-climbing-mount-hood/283-bd294b2f-8499-4127-9863-dacc1887936e

In the News: How recreation boosts local economies

A sleeping bag and bivouac sac, positioned on the shore of a Rogue River tributary.

Even if you don’t live in a “recreation county,” outdoor recreation may boost your local government’s bottom line.

But economists are starting to measure how access to recreation amenities affects migration, income growth, and spending – and one recent study suggests that having recreation-driven economy, defined as one tied to entertainment and seasonal visitors’ spending, can also lead to growth in both population and local wages.

Recreational amenities seems to attract both newcomers and tourists – and both are bringing economic growth to these areas that is measurably outpacing non-recreation counties, suggests a study conducted by Headwaters Economics, a nonprofit research group.

Full story, via High Country News: https://www.hcn.org/issues/51.8/recreation-how-recreation-boosts-the-economy

New permits to protect wilderness on select Central Oregon trails

A woman hikes past mountain peaks in the Three Sisters Wilderness, Deschutes National Forest, in a Sept. 16, 2016 USDA Forest Service file photo.

BEND, Ore. (May 13, 2019) – The Deschutes and Willamette National Forests will use permits to manage entry at trailheads within three Cascade wilderness areas, beginning the summer of 2020.

Starting next year, from the Friday before Memorial Day weekend through the last Friday in September, wilderness day use permits will be required at 19 of the 79 Forest Service trailheads across Mount Jefferson, Mount Washington, and Three Sisters Wilderness areas:

  • Mount Jefferson will have a day use permit system at seven trailheads (32 percent of all trailheads),
  • Mount Washington will have a day use permit system at two trailheads (20 percent of all trailheads) and
  • Three Sisters will have a day use permit system at 10 trailheads (21 percent of all trailheads).

Also during this time frame, overnight use will be managed through a permit system at all 79 trailheads within the three wildernesses.

Waldo Lake and Diamond Peak Wilderness areas will continue to operate with no day use or overnight limits.

For affected trailheads in the Mount Jefferson, Mount Washington, and Three Sisters Wilderness areas, some day use and overnight use permits will be available for advance reservations, while others will be retained for issue as next-day or same-day permits.

This permit system is intended to balance the needs of visitors planning trips, as well as visitors making spontaneous visits to wilderness areas, while managing the impacts of increased visitor interest and recreational use at these sites, Tracy Beck, Forest Supervisor, Willamette National Forest, said.

John Allen, Forest Supervisor, Deschutes National Forest, said the changes are needed to “protect the character of these special places for future generations.”

The forests began public outreach regarding the Central Cascades Wilderness Strategy Project in winter, 2016 after experiencing substantial increases in visitation during the previous four years. From 2012 through 2016, visitation to the Three Sisters Wilderness increased by more than 180 percent, with some trailheads experiencing increases between 300 and 500 percent.

The draft environmental analysis was released on April 4, 2018. Several hundred people commented on the draft environmental analysis through public meetings, phone calls, emails and letters.

The draft decision was issued November 14, 2018. Ninety people submitted formal comments on the draft decision.

Forest Supervisors and staff conducted eight meetings with objectors to resolve issues before the final decision was released. The decision can be viewed here: https://tinyurl.com/y27jmjzq.


Source information: Deschutes National Forest, Willamette National Forest (joint press release).

Newberry National Volcanic Monument summer 2019 operating hours announced

A view looking down from a high hillside at Paulina Lake and East Lake on a clear, sunny summer day

BEND, Ore. – May 13, 2019 The Deschutes National Forest has announced 2019 opening dates and summer season hours of operation for several visitor sites at the Newberry National Volcanic Monument.

Lava Lands Visitor Center, Lava Butte, Lava River Cave:

The Lava Lands Visitor Center, Lava Butte and Lava River Cave: are now open to visitors for the 2019 season. Beginning May 3, the visitor center and cave are open Thursday through Monday; Lava Lands Visitor Center is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Lava River Cave is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (site gate at the Lava River Cave closes at 3:45 p.m.).

On May 23, summer hours begin; both sites will open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily for the rest of the season.

Roads:

Deschutes County Rd. 21, which provides access to the monument’s Newberry Caldera, remains gated at 10 Mile Sno-Park due to winter driving hazards. The gate is currently scheduled to open on May 17. Limited access to recreation sites, boat ramps and trails will continue upon the opening of the caldera, due to snow loading. Recreation fees are required where posted. For more information or updates, visit www.deschutes.org/road.

Forest Service Rd. 9720 to Lava Cast Forest is open, and snow free.

Forest Service Road 500 to Paulina Peak is closed; opening date to be determined based on snowmelt (typically end of June to early July).

Lava Butte Shuttle Service: The Lava Butte Shuttle will operate on Memorial Day weekend, then daily from June 15 – Sept. 2. (Lava Butte is open to passenger vehicles when Lava Lands Visitor Center is open and the shuttle is not running).

Paulina Visitor Center: The Paulina Visitor Center is open weekends from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., beginning May 25. The center offers monument information, orientations, and a Discover Your Northwest bookstore.

Campgrounds:

  • Forest Service campgrounds in the caldera area will re-open as conditions permit (tentatively, May 24-June 12), for first-come, first-served camping.
  • Reservations open June 13 for the Little Crater, East Lake, Paulina and Newberry Group campgrounds.
  • Chief Paulina and Cinder Hill campgrounds are have delayed openings due to an ongoing tree removal project, and are tentatively scheduled to re-open June 27 and Aug. 1, respectively.

For more information about Newberry National Volcanic Monument, visit: www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/deschutes/recarea/?recid=66159.


Source information: USDA Forest Service – Deschutes National Forest (press release)

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