Category Archives: Forest Products

In the News: Capitol Christmas Tree-lighting

Forest Service Chief Vicki Christiansen gives a speech during the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony at the Capitol Building in Washington DC, December 6, 2018. USDA Forest Service photo by Cecilio Ricardo

In keeping with tradition, the 2018 U.S. Capitol Christmas tree, harvested from the Willamette National Forest’s Sweet Home Ranger District, was lit by the Speaker of the House (with help from Oregon 4th grader Bridgette Harrington) Dec. 6.

“This tree traveled 3,000 miles from Oregon, involving many different people of all ages and all walks of life, with events in many different communities, with celebrations along the way,” Vicki Christiansen, chief of the USDA Forest Service, said.

“Indeed, the entire journey, from the selection of the tree to its arrival in Washington DC reminds us of what we can accomplish if we unite for a common purpose. If we work together to sustain our nation’s forests, we can produce trees like this for generations to come.”

Below is roundup of media coverage as the tree completed it’s journey from Sweet Home, Ore. to Washington D.C., and the tree-lighting event.

Washington Post:

USA Today:

Albany Democrat-Herald:

Salem Statesman-Journal

The Oregonian / OregonLive:

Noble Pacific NW Christmas Tree Illumines Capitol Hill

The public gathers around U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree after being officially lit during Lighting Ceremony on the west lawn of the Capitol Building in Washington DC, December 6, 2018. USDA Forest Service photo by Cecilio Ricardo

A daytime view of the 2018 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree, outside the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington DC. The tree was harvested from the Willamette National Forest in Oregon, on the Sweet Home Ranger District, and is decorated with some of more than 10,000 ornaments hand-crafted by Oregonians as a gift to the country. More than 70 smaller trees, adorned with more of these ornaments, decorate the inside of the building and other locations on the Capitol grounds. USDA Forest Service photo.

A daytime view of the 2018 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree, outside the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington DC. The tree was harvested from the Willamette National Forest in Oregon, on the Sweet Home Ranger District, and is decorated with some of more than 10,000 ornaments hand-crafted by Oregonians as a gift to the country. More than 70 smaller trees, adorned with more of these ornaments, decorate the inside of the building and other locations on the Capitol grounds. USDA Forest Service photo.

With a brief countdown and the flick of a switch, the towering U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree, on the West Lawn of Capitol Hill, lit up the dark.

Visitors from all across America, who stood in near freezing temperatures beneath the majestic pine, cheered as the tree’s thousands of lights glistened the ornaments made especially for it.

Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, Congressman Paul Ryan assists as 4th grader, Brigette Harrington shares her poem during the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony at the Capitol Building in Washington DC, December 6, 2018. USDA Forest Service photo by Cecilio Ricardo

Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, Congressman Paul Ryan assists as 4th grader, Brigette Harrington shares her poem during the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony at the Capitol Building in Washington DC, December 6, 2018. USDA Forest Service photo by Cecilio Ricardo

Speaker of the House, Paul Ryan, handed over the honor of lighting the tree to Brigette Harrington, a fourth grader from Hillsboro, OR, who won an essay contest about Oregon’s outdoors sponsored by the USDA Forest Service, and the non-profit organization Choose Outdoors.

 

Following a tradition of nearly fifty years, set by the Architect of the Capitol, the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree comes from Forest Service -managed lands.

This year the Willamette National Forest in Oregon had the honors.

The massive tree is the first noble fir ever to be displayed on the West lawn of Capitol Hill as a national Christmas Tree.

Forest Service Chief Vicki Christiansen gives a speech during the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony at the Capitol Building in Washington DC, December 6, 2018. USDA Forest Service photo by Cecilio Ricardo

Forest Service Chief Vicki Christiansen gives a speech during the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony at the Capitol Building in Washington DC, December 6, 2018. USDA Forest Service photo by Cecilio Ricardo

Additionally, tree growers from Northwest Oregon donated 75 smaller companion trees to adorn government office buildings in the Nation’s Capital.

For well over a year, a team from the Willamette Forest planned the 3,000 mile journey from Oregon to Washington, D.C.— an adventure dubbed by much of the national media as the “reverse Oregon Trail.”

And the folks on the Willamette Forest are the first to point out that didn’t do it alone.

Thousands of volunteers from the Sweet Home District of the Willamette Forest, where the tree was harvested, plus more than 80 sponsors and partnering organizations, helped in a logistical effort that, no doubt, Santa Claus will present next year to his elves and reindeer as a best practice example of proper gift delivery.

And what a gift.

At 75 feet tall, with over 10,000 handmade ornaments from all over the state of Oregon, few gifts can match the outpouring of love this tree, fondly called “The People’s Tree” inspires.

Until New Year’s Eve, anyone visiting Washington, D.C. can come and admire the truly noble Christmas tree.

A nighttime view of the 2018 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree, outside the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington DC. The tree was harvested from the Willamette National Forest in Oregon, on the Sweet Home Ranger District, and is decorated with some of more than 10,000 ornaments hand-crafted by Oregonians as a gift to the country. More than 70 smaller trees, adorned with more of these ornaments, decorate the inside of the building and other locations on the Capitol grounds. USDA Forest Service photo.

A nighttime view of the 2018 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree, outside the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington DC. The tree was harvested from the Willamette National Forest in Oregon, on the Sweet Home Ranger District, and is decorated with some of more than 10,000 ornaments hand-crafted by Oregonians as a gift to the country. More than 70 smaller trees, adorned with more of these ornaments, decorate the inside of the building and other locations on the Capitol grounds. USDA Forest Service photo.



Source information: Robert Hudson Westover works for the USDA Forest Service, Office of Communication. This story was originally posted on the USDA website, at: https://www.usda.gov/media/blog/2018/12/07/noble-christmas-tree-illumines-capitol-hill

In the News: Oregon’s Freres Lumber grows mass timber market

Mass timber is a term for a new class of ultra-strong construction materials produced by cross-grained layers of wood. Freres Lumber Company in Oregon is producing a type of mass timber engineered panel from sheets of wood veneer that is strong enough to be used for framing multi-story construction. Image: Screen capture from video posted by the North American Forests Partnership at www.forestproud.org: https://forestproud.org/2018/04/06/mass-timber-kyle-freres-freres-lumber-co/

The website North American Forest Partnership (NAFP)’s website shares stories from its members, a diverse coalition of forest industry professionals, organizations, and government agencies (including the USDA Forest Service) that focus on relevant, responsible, and innovative efforts for forest management, conservation and sustainable harvesting.

This month, the site features a video on the Freres Lumber Company, which is expanding the marketplace for a new wood product called mass timber, which they are doing with some help from a $250,000 “Wood Innovation” grant, awarded in 2017.

The USDA Forest Service’s Wood Innovation grants are awarded annually invest in research and economic development that expands the wood products and wood energy markets.

From the website:

For more than 90 years, the Freres family has been a steward of Oregon’s forests. With responsibility for more than 17,000 acres in the Pacific Northwest, the family-owned Freres Lumber Company has long been a pioneer in sustainable forest management and manufacturing.

Today, Kyle and his family continue that tradition, blending technology and sustainability to create the building materials of the future: Mass Timber. The same sustainable and renewable wood engineered to replace steel and concrete on a scale not previously possible. #forestproud.

View the video on the #forestproud website, or below:



Source information: Shared by the North American Forest Partnership: https://forestproud.org/2018/04/06/mass-timber-kyle-freres-freres-lumber-co/.

‘Open Forest’ Christmas tree harvest e-permit pilot includes Mt. Hood NF

A screenshot from the welcome page on the Open Forest website: https://openforest.fs.usda.gov/christmas-trees/forests. The website will allow users on four National Forests, including the Mt. Hood National Forest, to purchase 2018 season Christmas Tree permits online. Image by USDA Forest Service.

SANDY, Ore. – The Mt. Hood National Forest is offering online Christmas tree permits through the Open Forest pilot program this holiday season!

The Mt. Hood National Forest is one of four National Forests participating in an online pilot program for holiday tree e-permits.

This pilot allows you to purchase your 2018 Christmas tree permit from the comfort of your own home, or by using your mobile device, instead of traveling to a Forest Service office or a local vendor.

These e-permits are good only for use on Mt. Hood National Forest, this holiday season.

Although purchased online, the permits must be printed to be valid.

You can learn more about purchasing your Mt. Hood holiday tree-harvest permit and gathering your Christmas tree online at: https://openforest.fs.usda.gov.

Holiday tree permits for all National Forests in the Pacific Northwest are also available at Ranger District visitor centers during regular business hours, and through many local vendors.

Permits cost $5 each; limit 3-5 permits per household (allowed quantities vary by forest, contact a local ranger district office for details specific to your area).

Safety advisory:

As the holiday season approaches, so does winter weather.  Weather changes rapidly at higher elevations and Forest Service roads are not maintained for winter travel. Carry traction devices, and be advised of winter road closures and any sno-park permit requirements (see Wash. Sno-Park and Oregon Sno-Park for info).

The Forest Service recommends you starting early in the day, and heading home well before dark. Here are some additional winter safety and holiday tree-harvesting tips:

  • Keep your family and your own safety in mind as you head out to look for a holiday tree; dress warmly and carry a forest map, snacks, and water.
  • Do not rely solely on your GPS, as electronic devices can stop working, or some information may not be accurate or up-to-date.
  • Bring items you’ll need to stay warm and dry, even if stranded outdoors without a working vehicle.
  • Have a trip plan; Make sure friends or family know where you are going, when you plan to return, and have a plan to contact law enforcement if you don’t arrive.
  • Remember to bring along a tool to cut your tree and rope or cord to secure it to your vehicle.
  • Don’t forget your first aid kit!
  • Our holiday tree webpage features a video with helpful hints for a successful holiday tree outing.

As a part of the “Every Kid” program, all fourth-graders can receive a holiday tree permit for free this season! They must have their Every Kid pass or voucher with them in order to receive their free holiday tree permit, and they must be accompanied by their parent or guardian. These special holiday tree permits can only be obtained at our official ranger district offices. For more information on the “Every Kid” program, please visit: www.everykidinapark.gov.

SWEET HOME TO DC: 2018 Capitol Christmas Tree team says ‘hello’ to Ohio!

The 2018 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree arrives in Harrison, Ohio Nov. 23, 2018. Courtesy photo by the Joy Trip Project (used with permission).

Each year, a National Forest provides a Christmas Tree for display on the U.S. Capitol lawn in Washington D.C. This year’s tree is travelling from the Willamette National Forest’s Sweet Home Ranger District, in the western Cascade mountain range. District Ranger Nikki Swanson is recording her notes from the journey for the Your Northwest Forests blog.

To read previous entries, visit https://yournorthwestforests.org/category/capitol-christmas-tree/.

For more information, visit the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree website, www.capitolchristmastree.com, and story map: https://arcg.is/10DOyv

Track the tree! Follow the 2018 Capitol Christmas Tree on its Return to the Oregon Trail journey in near real-time, at www.trackthetree.com


November 23rd, 2018
St. Louis, Mo.

Hello, Ohio!

We left the “gateway to the west” and headed due east 321 miles to Harrison, Ohio today. Its amazing how far away Oregon seems, both in space and time.

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The people of Harrison were amazed we had traveled so far, and seemed happy we chose to stop in their little town. We pulled into town to the cheers of over 3,000 people!

Harrison has a beautiful, nostalgic, historic downtown, and that’s where we conducted our last Capitol Christmas tree “whistle stop” event before the tree-lighting.

It was quite a scene! A men’s a cappella group sang as the tree rolled into town, accompanied by the clapping of the crowd. As soon as the tree stopped, several thousand people converged to sign the banners and to take pictures.

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I’m afraid I may have to adjust my view when I return to the real world. Throughout this trip people have offered us free coffee, food, and snacks.

The people of Harrison treated our entire team with our own tray of cookies from their amazing local bakery. So yummy!

People are so kind. You wouldn’t necessarily know it with what you see on the TV or in print, but it’s true; there is still a lot of kindness in the world. I feel so blessed to have seen it for myself.

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After dinner, our group went on an impromptu tour with a local historian to see the city’s underground tunnel.

President William Henry Harrison, who is buried nearby, was one of the proponents for the tunnel. He even sold his land to help pay for the tunnel’s construction. The tunnel was built from wood and brick, made from rock mined just outside the city. It was originally built to move water as part of the Whitewater Canal system, but has been has been used for many things throughout the years.

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Several people I talked to at the event said they were very happy to have the tree in their town.

They had many reasons.

Some people came to see their first noble fir tree, some came to sign the banner and add their name to the tens of thousands on our giant rolling “Christmas card,” others came to see some of the 10,000 hand-crafted ornaments Oregonians made to decorate the 2018 Capitol Christmas Tree (and other trees in side the U.S. Capitol building).

Some said they came to see it because just could not miss this once-in-a-lifetime event.

Some came for the events offered for their children, like ice skating on plastic composite “ice,” and making ornaments for their tree at home.

And then there were those who came specifically to see the truck!

The Kenworth W990 is fresh off the show room floor, and wrapped in a special 2018 Capitol Christmas Tree design.  Delivering the tree to the U.S. Capitol is its maiden voyage. Presence, power and personal style wrapped in a world class design that redefines the long hood conventional truck cab, with plenty of room for snacks, like our very large box of cheese-its!

What a show-stopper!

What a wonderful way to finish our tour! Tomorrow we have a quick stop, and then we are on to Maryland for the night and to deliver the tree to Joint Base Andrews. On Monday, we’ll deliver the tree to the U.S. Capitol!

PS: Even though the “whistle stops” are over, I will continue to blog until the tree is lit on December 5th.

Nikki Swanson
District Ranger, Sweet Home Ranger District
Willamette National Forest

 

 

 

SWEET HOME TO DC: 2018 Capitol Christmas Tree team celebrates Thanksgiving in St. Louis

A Modern Day Adventure on the Historic Oregon Trail

Each year, a National Forest provides a Christmas Tree for display on the U.S. Capitol lawn in Washington D.C. This year’s tree is travelling from the Willamette National Forest’s Sweet Home Ranger District, in the western Cascade mountain range. District Ranger Nikki Swanson is recording her notes from the journey for the Your Northwest Forests blog.

To read previous entries, visit https://yournorthwestforests.org/category/capitol-christmas-tree/.

For more information, visit the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree website, www.capitolchristmastree.com, and story map: https://arcg.is/10DOyv

Track the tree! Follow the 2018 Capitol Christmas Tree on its Return to the Oregon Trail journey in near real-time, at www.trackthetree.com


November 22nd, 2018
St. Louis, Mo.

Celebrating the 2018 Capitol Christmas Tree at the St. Louis Thanksgiving Day Parade

It’s Thanksgiving Day, and I am 2,054 miles from home. But I’m thankful for the technology that allows me to correspond without the need for the Pony Express.

It’s harder than I thought it would be to be away from my family during the holiday, and I don’t think I was alone in feeling that way. Emotions were near the surface for many of us this morning.

But our day was brightened by the parade!

Here we are getting ready to hand out some Smokey swag to parade goers!

And here we are, making our way to the parade route.

What an amazing thing to be a part of! The St. Louis Thanksgiving Day Parade is the second largest Thanksgiving Day parade in the United States. It was broadcast on live TV, and occasionally the parade would pause for a commercial break.

There were nearly 150 entries, including the amazing animal balloons that are filled with helium. I had only seen those on TV before today. They are pretty cool on TV.  They are WAY COOLER in person.

Smokey Bear and firefighters from the nearby Mark Twain National Forest joined our entry. It was a toss up over who had the most fans between the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree and Smokey Bear. Combined, I’m pretty sure they stole the show….. but, I’m only a little bit biased. Cries of “SMOKEY BEAR!” and “Look it’s the tree!” followed us along the entire parade route.

After the parade, we all ate together as a “tree team family.” We had a fantastic dinner.

Several people were heard to say that it was the best food they had ever eaten, from the butter, to the main course, to the desert. I, myself, have never remarked on the excellence of butter before tonight, but I was not alone in stating this particular fact out loud!

Some of us had traditional Thanksgiving turkey dinner, and some ventured away from the holiday menu. But all enjoyed their meal!

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Following dinner, we dispersed to nap, exercise, or to call family back home.

After so many days and nights on the road, we’re all thankful to spend two nights in the same hotel and to have an opportunity to rest up a bit before the journey begins anew in the morning.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Nikki Swanson
District Ranger, Sweet Home Ranger District
Willamette National Forest

 

 

 

 

 

Holiday Tree permits on sale at National Forest offices

An evergreen adorned with handmade ornaments

It’s the most wonderful time of the year… time to visit your nearest national forest to find the perfect holiday tree for your home!

Christmas tree permits are available at National Forest offices and selected vendors throughout the Pacific Northwest for $5 each.

Each permit allows the holder to cut one tree in designated areas; each household can purchase up to a maximum of five permits.

For permit purchasing locations, contact your local national forest office (for a directory of USDA Forest Service offices in Washington and Oregon, visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/r6/about-region/?cid=stelprdb5341313).

More information:

Don’t forget:

As part of the national Every Kid in a Park initiative, all fourth-graders are eligible for a free holiday tree permit from their USDA Forest Service office, for use on their local national forest.

EKIP holiday tree ornament coloring page

4th-graders: Click the image above to download a coloring page, with instructions to visit www.everykidinapark.gov for information about how to claim your voucher for a free holiday tree permit from the USDA Forest Service, and get a free annual pass to explore federal lands across the U.S. this year with your family!

Visit the Every Kid in a Park website at www.everykidinapark.gov for more information about how fourth-grade students can claim their free tree permit voucher and a one-year annual pass to explore national forests and other public lands across the U.S.

Holiday Tree Graphic_FB



Source: USDA Forest Service – Pacific Northwest Region public affairs staff

SWEET HOME TO DC: 2018 Capitol Christmas Tree completes Oregon Trail leg

A Modern Day Adventure on the Historic Oregon Trail

Each year, a National Forest provides a Christmas Tree for display on the U.S. Capitol lawn in Washington D.C. This year’s tree is travelling from the Willamette National Forest’s Sweet Home Ranger District, in the western Cascade mountain range. District Ranger Nikki Swanson is recording her notes from the journey for the Your Northwest Forests blog.

To read previous entries, visit https://yournorthwestforests.org/category/capitol-christmas-tree/.

For more information, visit the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree website, www.capitolchristmastree.com, and story map: https://arcg.is/10DOyv

Track the tree! Follow the 2018 Capitol Christmas Tree on its Return to the Oregon Trail journey in near real-time, at www.trackthetree.com


November 21st, 2018
St. Louis, Mo.

We have completed the Oregon Trail portion of our journey!

Today, we reached Independence, Mo., where the Oregon Trail began.

Although we and the 2018 Capitol Christmas Tree are not done with our journey, this marks a major milestone for us, as it means we have traveled the length of the entire Oregon trail during our trip.

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There is a monument, here, that to mark the starting point for the Oregon Trail.

It reads: “This monument honors the pioneer spirit of these courageous men and women who by their heroic trek across the continent established homes and civilization in the far northwest.”

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Ahead of those pioneers lay 2,000 miles of prairies, river crossings, mountains and whatever weather nature dished out. Ahead lay a dream of land ownership and a better way of life.

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A modern day “covered wagon”!

Independence, Mo. was a river port which specialized in outfitting travel along the Oregon Trail, and it was our first stop for the day.

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What a lovely event it was! There were wonderful people dressed in historic pioneer clothing that helped make covered wagon ornaments. The library provided maps of our route along the Oregon Trail, and read several pioneer stories to the children.

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Some days, the world seems smaller than others. Today was one of those days. I met a lovely couple who are good friends with the people who won the “find your ornament” contest on the Willamette National Forest’s Sweet Home Ranger District, where I work.

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I took their photo so their friend could see they were there. This sort of thing has happened throughout the trip, with family members signing the banner and then taking a photo to send to relatives so that they can sign in the same place at future stops.

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It continuously amazes me how connected we are, even when we are separated by 2,000 miles. I suppose similar experience happened to the Oregon Trail pioneers as they carved their name in a rock or left messages for those coming after them.

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After the Independence event, we traveled to the nearby Mt. Washington Cemetery because we heard that Jim Bridger’s memorial was there. Jim Bridger was such an instrumental part of the Oregon Trail story that we just HAD to go and see it. Not even a washed out bridge with a narrow crossing could stop us from our mission!

We found the grave site, and felt the power of connection once more. It was only a few days before that we stood in a snowstorm at Fort Bridger, where Jim advised and outfitted so many pioneers as they progressed on the trail.

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Our next stop was St. Louis, Missouri. Members of our tree team hurried, even jogging part of the way, to attempt to reach the Gateway Arch before it closed for the day!

We didn’t make it in time to go in the arch, but we were able to go into the museum and to explore around the arch.

It was a beautiful night with a nearly full moon and the place seemed absolutely enchanted.

The arch is an engineering masterpiece! It is so amazing.  This is a place I will return to, when I have more time to explore.

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The museum under the arch was also incredible. St. Louis is often referred to as the Gateway to the West because it was a popular gathering area for many people who later settled in the western territories.

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The museum had many exhibits and some great video of what life on the Oregon Trail might have looked like, as well as several first hand account displays of what life was like during the great human migration to the west.

Nikki Swanson
District Ranger, Sweet Home Ranger District
Willamette National Forest

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Regional Forester: Forest Service looking to listen and work towards resolution in Blues’ meetings

Leadership Corner - Glenn Casamassa

By Glenn Casamassa, Pacific Northwest Regional Forester  –

Next week, I will be participating with a team of folks from the Forest Service headquarters in Washington, D.C., in Objections Resolution meetings for the Revised Forest Plans for the Malheur, Umatilla, and Wallowa-Whitman National Forests. We will also be joined by other representatives from the Regional Office in Portland, Ore., and the involved National Forests.

Throughout this process, we received about 350 objection letters and have invited objectors from across the communities of Eastern Oregon to join us to discuss them.

I have worked closely with the Reviewing Officer, Chris French, for years and I know he and the team are as deeply committed to understanding your concerns as we are in the region.

We are coming to listen and hopefully begin the process of resolving your concerns and refining a shared vision for the future of these forests we all value.

It is important to all of us that we get to just sit down and talk with objectors and interested persons face-to-face.

The team has reviewed the objections and now, with this first round of meetings, we will all have an opportunity to work toward resolution—not in a room back in D.C., but rather there in the communities with you as citizens and stakeholders directly.

We hope to engage in meaningful dialogue and really listen to the issues of concern and to understand the underlying values that are important to each of you, your neighbors and the communities at large.

We’re committed to openness and are looking forward to the dialogue and opportunities for resolution that may surface.

I have had the opportunity to meet with several of your elected officials and our Forest Service partners thus far, and I have been moved by their commitment to the land and all of you.

Your communities are proud and resilient.

We want you to know that the team and I will be engaging directly with those who submitted objections during this process and we are ready to listen.

I hope to meet many of you next week.

Kind regards,

Glenn Casamassa
Regional Forester;
USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region


Source Information: Glenn Casamassa is the Regional Forest for the USDA Forest Service – Pacific Northwest Region, supervising operations and staff on all national forests and grassland in Oregon and Washington State. For more information about the Blue Mountains Forest Plan planning process and scheduled objections resolution meetings, visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detailfull/r6/landmanagement/planning/?cid=fseprd584707&width=full

 

SWEET HOME TO DC: 2018 Capitol Christmas Tree makes way from Perry, Kansas to Kansas City, Mo.

Nikki Swanson, Sweet Home district ranger (Willamette National Forest) road in a stagecoach with the mayor and Santa Claus during the 2018 U.S. Capitol Christmas tree whistle stop event in Perry, Kansas Nov. 20, 2018. USDA Forest Service photo.

A Modern Day Adventure on the Historic Oregon Trail

Each year, a National Forest provides a Christmas Tree for display on the U.S. Capitol lawn in Washington D.C. This year’s tree is travelling from the Willamette National Forest’s Sweet Home Ranger District, in the western Cascade mountain range. District Ranger Nikki Swanson is recording her notes from the journey for the Your Northwest Forests blog.

To read previous entries, visit https://yournorthwestforests.org/category/capitol-christmas-tree/.

For more information, visit the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree website, www.capitolchristmastree.com, and story map: https://arcg.is/10DOyv

Track the tree! Follow the 2018 Capitol Christmas Tree on its Return to the Oregon Trail journey in near real-time, at www.trackthetree.com


November 20th, 2018
Kansas City, Mo.

Nebraska City, Nebraska… to Perry, Kansas… to Kansas City, Missouri!

Three states in one day! Today was a mighty fine day that took us and the 2018 Capitol Christmas tree on quite an adventure, from small town America to the big city.

We had two “whistle stop” events today, which could not have been more different – but were both amazing.

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We started the day traveling from Nebraska City, Neb. to Perry, Kansas, 131 miles away.  The weather was again good. We’ve been blessed with good weather. We’ve have had many more good days than bad on this adventure.

The city of Perry pulled out all of the stops! All of my favorite things were present; there were horses, children, and Smokey! I got to ride with the stagecoach driver to transport the Governor, the Mayor, and SANTA! What a special treat.

Our arrival was welcomed with American flags lining the road. Perry’s community pride was evident throughout the celebration. The kind staff at the high school prepared lunch for us. We were very thankful.

The event was at the high school, and the younger students were bussed over.

I think this stop had the most young people present of any event we’ve had, so far. The leaders of today and tomorrow signed the banners and learned a bit more about the Forest Service and the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree.

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Our final stop for the day was Kansas City, Mo., 53 miles from our last stop.  We were welcomed by a life size statue of a Tyrannosaurus Rex.

Quite the contrast to Perry. We were definitely not in Kansas any more!

The event was held at Union Station an absolutely beautiful building inside and out.  It was decorated for Christmas with lights and ribbon and a model train for the young, and the young at heart.

Several sponsors donated giveaways such as hats and pins. There was also free food for everyone including fresh dipped caramel apples, s’mores, pretzels and hot dogs!

This was a bountiful day for food. Unlike the Oregon Trail pioneers, no one in our group went hungry.

The skill of our drivers and the aid of local law enforcement were once again instrumental to our successful day.

Maneuvering the tree on city streets during rush hour was tricky business.

Not everyone understands that big trucks need a whole lot of room. And, it’s such a sight to see that people just naturally just stop what they are doing to stare and watch it go by.

Tomorrow is a big day, we go to Independence, Mo. to the official starting point of the Oregon Tail, marking a significant milestone in our journey.

Happy trails, until then!

Nikki Swanson
District Ranger, Sweet Home Ranger District
Willamette National Forest

The 2018 U.S. Capitol Christmas tree team conducted its second whistle stop event of the day at Union Station in Kansas City, Mo. Nov. 20, 2018. USDA Forest Service photo.

Nikki Swanson, Sweet Home district ranger, is travelling with the 2018 U.S. Capitol Christmas tree from Willamette National Forest, Oregon to Washington D.C. The tree is traveling a reverse route along the Oregon Trail National Historic Trail, in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the National Trails Act. Here, Swanson poses with a tree at Union Station in Kansas City, Mo. Nov. 20, 2018. USDA Forest Service photo.

 

 

 

 

 

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