Monthly Archives: October 2018

Forest Service releases new outfitter-guide finder

A hunter looks out over a lake from a cliff

Adventure-seekers in search of an expert guide for their next National Forest adventure in Washington and Oregon need look no further than the Pacific Northwest region’s new outfitter-guide locator.

The new, web-based tool allows visitors to quickly and easily search a directory of outfitters and guides with current operating permits by activity, or forest.

Outfitters and guides are great resources for National Forest visitors who want to try a new activity, improve their proficiency, or explore the back-country with the benefit of a guide who has first-hand knowledge of the area.

(Wondering what the difference is? Guides typically provide expert experience and knowledge, while outfitter-guides also provide some or all of the gear and equipment needed to enhance the outdoor experience. Both require a permit from the National Forest the activity will take place on, to help forest managers track commercial usage and to ensure favorite locations or resources aren’t being over-used).

Outfitter-guide permit holders on Pacific Northwest forests in Washington and Oregon include almost every outdoor activity you can think of, including hunting, fishing, camping, climbing, hiking, cycling, dog-sledding, horseback riding, kayaking, rafting, mountain biking, and even heli-skiing!

Looking for a guide to your next adventure on Your Northwest Forests?

Check out the Pacific Northwest region’s National Forest outfitter-guide finder at:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/r6/passes-permits/recreation/?cid=fseprd588624



Source information: USDA Forest Service – Pacific Northwest Region staff report

Forest Feature: Bats

Close up of Big Brown Bats

Here in Your Northwest Forests, we’re batty for bats! These creatures of the night may have a spooky reputation – but bats are actually incredibly interesting animals who play an important role in maintaining the health of our forests, farms, and even help save human lives!

Close up photo of the face of a pallid bat

This pallid bat is being examined by a researcher. Pallid bats are found in dry areas across the western United States, including Oregon and central and eastern parts of Washington State. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Photo by Ann Froschauer.

Check out these bat facts –

Bats are the only mammals capable of true flight (other airborne mammals, like flying squirrels, can glide but can’t flap their wings to rise higher or increase their speed).

People sometimes use the expression “blind as a bat.” But, bats aren’t blind! However, some can also sense objects using echolocation, using high-frequency sound and then listening to the echos to create a “map” of the area their mind to navigate even when it’s too dark for them to see with their eyes.

Forest Service researchers discovered that bat’s wings can be used to identify individual bats—much like human fingerprints.

Most bats eat fruit or insects – but there are three species of vampire bat that bite and then drink the blood from larger animals, like cows and horses. That might sound creepy, but scientists have found powerful anticoagulant in their saliva that is now used to save human lives! The drug Draculin, named after Count Dracula (a fictional vampire often depicted as able to transform into a bat), is used to break up blood clots in people that have suffered strokes or heart attacks.

Bats also help humans in other ways:

A young Mariana fruit bat hangs upside-down

This young Mariana fruit bat looks at the world upside down. These endangered bats are among the largest bat species, called “mega bats,” or “flying foxes,” and are native to Guam and other Pacific Islands. US Fish & Wildlife Service photo by Anne Brooke.

They eat insect pests that cost farmers and foresters billions of dollars annually. In the U.S., researchers estimate bats save farmers $3.7 billion a year in reduced crop damage and pesticide use.

They’re also important pollinators for many fresh fruits and vegetables. Avocados, coconut palm trees, vanilla beans, papaya and agave are just some of the crops that rely on bats to help them produce things humans like to eat!

In the tropics, bats help spread seeds for many fruit trees, including figs, mangos, and bananas.

And bat droppings, or guano, are a powerful fertilizer used to grow crops around the world.

Bats need our help, too!

There are 47 species of bat in the United States, and more than half are either rapidly declining in number, or are listed as threatened or endangered species.

In the Pacific Northwest, a species called the Little Brown Bat is under threat from a disease called “white nose syndrome.”

This fungal infection, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans, interrupts their winter hibernation, leaving them weak and sick by spring – if they survive, at all.

If you visit caves or other places that bats like to roost, you can help by cleaning your clothing (including your shoes) before you enter, and after you leave, to prevent spreading the fungus that causes the disease to another location.

A little brown bat roosts in a cave.

A healthy little brown bat roosts in a cave in a Feb. 9, 2011 photo. White nose syndrome is a fungal infection that is threatening this species. The disease causes irritation (including a tell-tale white crust around the mouth and nose) that disrupts the bat’s winter hibernation, causing it to lose fat stores too quickly. This often kills the bat, starving them by the end of the winter, or leaving them weak and vulnerable to secondary infections when they emerge from hibernation. U.S. Fish & Wildlife photo by Ann Froschauer.

During the week leading up to Halloween, the USDA Forest Service joins conservationists, biologists, and educators around the world in celebrating “Bat Week.”

This year, Bat Week is Oct. 24-31, 2018.

Here in the Pacific Northwest, USDA Forest Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees will be at the Oregon Zoo Oct. 27 & 28 to educate visitors and provide bat-week activities for guests of all ages. Find more info on the Your Northwest Forests event calendar.

Image of a bat, and text: Na-na Na-na Na-na Na-na BAT WEEK! #BatAppreciationWeek @ForestService

Bat Appreciation Week is Oct. 24-31, 2018! Visit the Oregon Zoo Oct. 28-29 to join the USDA Forest Service and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service for a bat week celebration and educational activities.

Here are more ways you can celebrate Bat Week!

  • Turn out the lights! Light pollution affects insect populations, which disrupts the bats who feed on them at night.
  • Get familiar with all the different foods made possible by bats! Use the Bat Week Cookbook to make a delicious meal to share with your friends and family.
  • Check out this TedEd presentation by bat researcher Amy Wray: “I’m Batman” – https://ed.ted.com/lessons/i-m-batman-amy-wray
  • Build a bat house! Buy kits online from hardware and building supply stores (pro tip: look for designs certified by Bat Conservation International), or use these instructions from the National Wildlife Foundation: https://www.nwf.org/en/Garden-for-Wildlife/Cover/Build-a-Bat-House.
  • Plant a bat garden! Flowers can provide nectar or pollen that draws moths or insects North American bats like to eat. Bergamot, Smooth Pentesemon, and Choke Cherry are just some of the plants recommended in this sample plan, created by the Forest Service.
  • Host your own Bat Week party or event! You can find instructions for fun activities like making origami bats, bat party favors, bat-themed finger puppets and masks, coloring pages, and more at http://batweek.org/bat-week-tool-kit/.

Find more Bat Week ideas at http://batweek.org/can-make-difference/.



Source information: Forest Features highlight a new Pacific Northwest species (or sometimes family, order, kingdom, or genus) each month, as part of the USDA Forest Service – Pacific Northwest Region’s regional youth engagement strategy.

If you’d like more information about this topic, or other ways the Forest Service can help incorporate Pacific Northwest environmental education and forest science in your classroom, email us at YourNorthwestForests@fs.fed.us.

In the News: First-of-kind torrefaction plant to open in eastern Oregon

A forested hill, with snow-dusted mountain tops in the distance.

Northwest News Network reporter Tom Banse explains “torrefaction” in this story about a first-of-it’s-kind facility for converting wood chips into a material that can be used as a substitute fuel in coal-fired power plants.

The facility will be located inside the Malheur Lumber Company mill in John Day, Ore. Wood chips will be supplied from biomass produced by stewardship work on the Malheur National Forest.

A major challenge to the Forest Service ability to coordinate stewardship work is the lack of commercially viable markets for biomass, which includes small-diameter trees and branches of the type removed during fuels reduction and forest thinning projects. The agency contributed financially to the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities, Inc. wood-to-energy grant program, which funds research towards developing new, commercially-viable wood-based biofuels products .

Full story, via Spokane Public Radio: http://www.spokanepublicradio.org/post/your-word-day-torrefaction-first-its-kind-plant-open-eastern-oregon